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Mighty in Sorrow

I’m over the moon and pleased as Punch to reveal that I’ve got a story, “A Garden of Cucumbers,” appearing in Mighty in Sorrow: A tribute to David Tibet and Current 93, the latest anthology from Dynatox Ministries. And I’m sharing space with one hell of a lineup of awesome authors (see below).

Big thanks to editor/publisher/propagandist Jordan Krall, for accepting my twisted tale of mysticism and martyrdom, and to Ari Eberlin, who worked with me at Wherehouse Records #93 in about ’93 and turned me on to Current 93, much to the chagrin of the blue-hairs. Ponder that Gnostic number sequence and take a look at this lovely cover.

MightyInSorrow

Right now, you can order the book for Amazon Kindle, with a trade paperback coming soon.

Here’s the full TOC:

Table of Contents
Andrew Liles – Foreword
Nikki Guerlain – SMOKE WINDING THROUGH PETRICHOR
Michael Griffin – MAY DAWN REDEEM WHAT NIGHT DESTROYS
Ross E. Lockhart – A GARDEN OF CUCUMBERS
Daniel Mills – WHISTLER’S GORE
Nicole Cushing – THE SUFFERING CLOWN
Josh Myers – AIRWAVES BURST TO BLISSFUL
Edward Morris – LULLABY
Ian Delacroix – THE MAN OF THE CROSSES
Jon R. Meyers – ALL IN A ROW
Kent Gowran – THROUGH OUR MASTER’S BLOOD WE SING
Michael Allen Rose – THE PUPPET OF GRUDGES
Neal Alan Spurlock – ANYWAY PEOPLE DIE
D.P. Watt – MALICE AND MAJESTY
Bob Freeman – MOURN NOT THE SLEEPLESS CHILDREN
Andrew Wayne Adams – ADAM CATMAN
Jayaprakash Satyamurthy – ‘there comes a midnighthour…’
James Champagne – THE WITHERING ECHO
Robert M. Price – THE INMOST DARKNESS
Joseph Pulver Sr. – when the twilighttwilight of nihil.nihil chimes…
Dustin Reade – CHRIST BEGAT THE PERVERSIONS
Michael Göttert – SHADOWS AND ABYSS
Dinah Prim – THE INVOCATION OF NODDY
Chris Kelso – NIGHTMARE FOR THE IRON YOUTH
Thomas Ligotti – IN A FOREIGN TOWN, IN A FOREIGN LAND
Hyacinthe L. Raven – OR ALONE

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The Children of Old Leech are coming…

There are Things–terrifying Things–whispered of in darkened forests beyond the safe comfort of firelight: The Black Guide, the Broken Ouroboros, the Pageant, Belphegor, Old Leech…

These Things have always been here. They predate you. They will outlast you.

This book pays tribute to those Things.

For We are the Children of Old Leech… and we love you.

We are the Children of Old Leech... and we love you.

The Children of Old Leech
A Tribute to the Carnivorous Cosmos of Laird Barron

Edited by Ross E. Lockhart & Justin Steele
Cover design by Matthew Revert

Coming summer 2014 from Word Horde

TOC to be unveiled soon

Reviewer inquiries to publicity[at]wordhorde[dot]com

PS: Happy Birthday, Laird!

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Tales of Jack the Ripper: Just $2.99 for a limited time!

“It’s elementary, folks,” says Inspector Elinor. “Simple math. Two dollars and ninety-nine cents equals Tales of Jack the Ripper on your Kindle, smartphone, or tablet. So visit Amazon and download a copy of Tales of Jack the Ripper, edited by Ross E. Lockhart. Watson and I need the clues you will find in the ebook to track down Jack the Ripper and bring the cur to justice.”

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Buy Tales of Jack the Ripper for your Kindle right here.

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Chick Bassist and the Suicide Girls

As you probably know, I wrote a book called Chick Bassist, it’s a love letter to rock ‘n’ roll and it was published in late 2012 by Lazy Fascist Press. Chick Bassist follows the trials and tribulations of a trio of punk rockers, Heroes for Goats, as their band breaks up and they strike out in their own directions. It’s about love and sex and drugs and dumb decisions and revenge and–most of all–the indomitable can-do spirit of rock ‘n’ roll. Chick Bassist is thin enough to fit in your guitar case, smart enough to have you thinking about the book for days after you’re done reading, and well-worth reading on the bus between gigs. But don’t take my word for it:

Chick Bassist is utterly savage. Lockhart’s style waxes poetic as a modern Beat giving us a glimpse into Rock & Roll hell.” —Laird Barron, Shirley Jackson Award-winning author of The Croning

“Complete rock excellence.” –Adam Cesare, author of Video Night and Tribesmen

“…the most fun read of its type since Harlan Ellison’s Spider Kiss.” –Edward Morris, author of Blackguard 1: Fathers and Sons

“Don’t start a band without reading Chick Bassist!” –J. M. McDermott, author of Last Dragon

“Holy fucking fuck what a great book.” —MP Johnson, author of The Afterlife of Pork-Knuckles Malone

“Crank the volume up and read it now.” —Gabino Iglesias, Verbicide Magazine

Right around the time Chick Bassist was published, I met a very, very cool person: author, photographer, and model Tiffany Scandal. Tiffany’s debut novel, punk-rock apocalypse There’s No Happy Ending was just published as part of Eraserhead Press’s New Bizarro Author Series, and it’s easily one of the best books I read this year.

There's No Happy Ending

Tiffany recently got together a group of friends for a special photo shoot featuring some of her favorite books, notably these shots including Chick Bassist, a vintage Fender P-Bass, and a cadre of Suicide Girls. She sent me the photos Christmas morning (best stocking stuffer ever), and I hope you enjoy them…

Chick Bassist and the Suicide Girls

Models from left to right are Dali Moon (Dali Suicide), Selene Suicide, Jessica (Persephone Suicide), Lyxzen Suicide, and Amanda (Rourke Suicide).

Chick Bassist and the Suicide Girls #2

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For your consideration…

It is award season once again in genre fiction land, so I’ve been fielding occasional queries wondering whether Tales of Jack the Ripper (Word Horde) and its contents are eligible for various awards. In the interest of placing all the necessary information at your fingertips (and mine), here is some statistical information on the anthology that I hope will both inform and enlighten.

Think you know everything there is to know about the Whitechapel slayings? You don't know Jack!

The anthology Tales of Jack the Ripper was published August 31, 2013, and is comprised of seventeen stories, two poems, and an introduction. Of those seventeen stories, three are reprints, as are the two poems, and fourteen stories are original to the anthology. Tales of Jack the Ripper is a professional market, paying .05/word for original stories and .02/word for reprints. The anthology as a whole should be eligible for consideration in most industry awards’ Anthology categories. The book is 75,859 words total; 60,134 original [79.27%]; 15,723 reprint [20.72%].

The following original stories should be eligible for consideration in most Novelette/Novella/Mid-Length Fiction categories:
Barron, Laird: “Termination Dust” 10101 words
Kurtz, Ed: “Hell Broke Loose” 9796 words
Sargent, Stanley C.: “When the Means Just Defy the End” 12226 words

The following original stories should be eligible for consideration in most Short Fiction categories:
Drake, Ennis: “The Butcher, The Baker, The Candlestick Maker” 4300 words
Grau, T.E.: “The Truffle Pig” 2840 words
Greatshell, Walter: “Ripping” 2302 words
Grey, Orrin: “Ripperology” 2800 words
Moreno-Garcia, Silvia: “Abandon All Flesh” 2200 words
Morris, Edward: “Where Have You Been All My Life?” 1900 words
Pulver, Joseph S.: “Juliette’s New Toy” 861 words
Rawlik, Pete: “Villains by Necessity” 2149 words
Tobler, E. Catherine: “Once November” 2400 words
Tumblety, Patrick: “Something About Dr. Tumblety” 4114 words
Yardley, Mercedes M.: “A Pretty for Polly” 1600 words

Editor Ross E. Lockhart is eligible to be nominated as Best Editor (Short Form) for Tales of Jack the Ripper, and as Best Editor (Long Form) for works published in 2013 (all of which are also worthy of your consideration), including Blind Gods Bluff, by Richard Lee Byers; Earth Thirst, by Mark Teppo; No Return, by Zachary Jernigan; Binding, by Carol Wolf; The Beautiful Thing that Awaits Us All, by Laird Barron, The Daedalus Incident, by Michael J. Martinez, and Reanimators, by Pete Rawlik.

Publisher Word Horde is eligible to be nominated (where applicable) as Best Publisher.

On behalf of Word Horde and the authors included in Tales of Jack the Ripper, thank you for your consideration and support during this year’s oh-so-competitive awards season.

Sincerely,

Ross E. Lockhart
Word Horde

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Lou Reed

I fell in love with Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” before I could fully understand it. Something in the storytelling seemed magical, New York City painted as a decadent, transformative wonderland, a destination–a Mecca, if you will–where girls could be boys and boys could be girls, where Herbie Flowers’ doubled bass line stalked the mean streets like a predator and the colored girls (a backing group called Thunderthighs) sang, “Doo do doo, doo do doo, doo do doo.” I wanted to be a part of that Factory scene, so glamorous and chilling, imbued with the spirit of rock ‘n’ roll, worshipfully waiting for the sax solo to kick in. I wanted to run away to that city, live that dream.

Rock N Roll Animal

I never made it to New York City, though I pictured myself standing on its corners, waiting for the man long before I realized what, exactly, Lou was waiting for. And today’s NYC is nothing like the sweaty, speedy scene of 1972, but that didn’t stop me from loving Lou Reed’s music, and that fabled city from which his poetry sprang.

Lou Reed provided the score for some of the dumbest things I’ve ever done, like those times I tried to feel like Jesus’ Son, or accompanying a friend as he sought passage on that great big clipper ship. But Lou also soundtracked my greatest triumphs. On “A Perfect Day” fourteen years ago this Wednesday, Jennifer and I embarked on our first dance as man and wife, and we’re still dancing.

Without Lou Reed I may never have picked up a guitar. May never have picked up a pen and written my own tales of magic and loss. Lou Reed made me want to play rock ‘n’ roll, want to live a rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle. He was a massive influence on my punk rock novel Chick Bassist, and his passing this Sunday on the one hand saddens me, but on the other makes me want to pay it back, to let you know how much this man and his songs meant to me.

Chick Bassist

So, by special arrangement with Lazy Fascist Press and Amazon.com, I’d like to offer you a chance to check out Chick Bassist on Kindle for just 99¢, and I’d like to dedicate this sale to Lou. Thanks for the music.

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Got any plans this Saturday? Tales of Jack the Ripper meet-and-greet at Copperfield’s Books in Petaluma

Do you have any plans this Saturday? If not, I’d encourage you to drop by Petaluma’s Copperfield’s Books, where I will be doing a meet-and-greet in support of my latest anthology, Tales of Jack the Ripper. This is your best chance to get a signed copy of the anthology. Plus, it makes a great gift for the ghoul in your life.

As you may know, 2013 is the 125th anniversary of perhaps the most famous cold case in history, the legendary Whitechapel slayings. Over the past century and a quarter, countless stories, books, and movies have explored the sanguine legacy of the first serial killer to achieve rock star status. Today, we are still drawn to tales of heinous killers and their prey. But before Hannibal Lector, Patrick Bateman, and Dexter Morgan, there was Jack the Ripper. The difference? Jack was real. Tales of Jack the Ripper contains seventeen stories and two poems from many of the most distinct voices in dark fantasy and horror, including Laird Barron, Ramsey Campbell, Ennis Drake, Orrin Grey, Joe R. Lansdale, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, E. Catherine Tobler, and Mercedes M. Yardley.

And if you’re not able to make it by Copperfield’s Books in Petaluma this Saturday, October 5 (I’ll be there between 1:30 and 3:30), please do drop by and check out the Tales of Jack the Ripper window display. It may be just the thing to put you in a Halloween mood.

Here’s just some of the critical praise Tales of Jack the Ripper has received so far:

Tales of Jack the Ripper manages to walk that fine line between entertainment and exploitation with real finesse. It’s a gripping group of stories about one of our most enduring mysteries, and well worth your time.” –FEARnet.com

“Editor Ross Lockhart (Book of Cthulhu and Book of Cthulhu 2, Chick Bassist) has done a stand-out job with Tales of Jack the Ripper. This one’s going out to certain names on my Christmas list, that’s for sure. You know the ones. With their ‘funny little games’. Recommended.” –Martian Migraine Press

“There is a definite ‘weird tale’ edge to many of the stories (and poems) in the anthology, which in this reader’s opinion is a GREAT thing. It might even be expected from Lockhart, who also brought you The Book of Cthulhu and its follow-up, The Book of Cthulhu 2. This doesn’t mean you can pigeonhole Tales of Jack the Ripper. [...] You need to get up off your lazy duff and buy this collection.” –Shock Totem

“Tales of Jack the Ripper marks a strong debut for Word Horde. Lockhart, in usual fashion, has managed to put together a strong, multifaceted anthology that explores the Ripper legend at length. If this book is indicative of what’s to be expected from his new press, than readers have much to look forward to.” –The Arkham Digest

“…there’s enough variation of theme and style here to interest almost any crime or horror reader…” –The Big Click

“Readers interested in Jack the Ripper will love this anthology. Horror fans in general should be quite pleased.” –Tangent

“The bottom line is these are all excellent stories, all about Jack.” –Hellnotes

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The Double Event

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They called her Long Liz, but she had been born Elisabeth Gustafsdotter in Torslanda, Sweden. Life was hard for Liz, by the age of twenty-two she had already been arrested for prostitution in Gothenberg, treated twice for STDs, and given birth to a stillborn daughter. In 1866, Liz moved from Sweden to London, taking a job as a servant to a “foreign gentleman.” A few years later, in March of 1869, Liz married John Stride, and until 1875 the couple ran a coffee shop on Chrisp Street in Poplar. In 1878, two steam ships, the Princess Alice and the Bywell Castle collided in the Thames, killing between six and seven hundred people. Liz would claim that the maritime disaster had taken her husband and children, and also blame the accident for the loss of several of her teeth, as she had been kicked in the mouth attempting to climb the sinking ship’s mast to safety, but records show that John Stride actually died in 1884, so many theorize that Liz’s dramatic tale may have been a plea for sympathy. Regardless,Long Liz falls into a cycle of poverty, addiction, crime, and occasional charity until late 1888.

Late on September 29, 1888, Long Liz was seen drinking with a short, mustached man in a billycock hat and mourning suit at Bricklayer’s Arms Public House on Settles Street. It was raining that night, and witnesses reported that the pair were very physical with one another, kissing and embracing. As they left the pub, an acquaintance called out to Liz, saying, “That’s Leather Apron getting ’round you,” referencing the recent murders of Mary Nichols and Annie Chapman. At midnight, Long Liz and her companion may have stopped to buy grapes from Matthew Packer’s stall. If this detail is true, Packer would have been the last person, besides her murderer, to have seen Long Liz alive.

Catherine “Kate” Eddowes was born in Wolverhampton in 1842. She was educated in charity schools and workhouses until taking up with a young pensioner named Thomas Conway at the age of twenty-one. Though the pair never married, they did have three children together, and Kate had Thomas’s initials tattooed on her left forearm. The couple split up in 1881, and Kate took up with John Kelly, a man who worked odd jobs, but had a regular gig with a fruit seller. For years, when the season would roll around, the pair would go hop picking. But like many residents of Whitechapel, the couple were often hard up for cash.

Though Kate did not have a reputation for heavy drink, the evening of September 29 found her arrested for public drunkenness. Over the course of the day she had pawned a pair of John’s boots and attempted to visit her now-married daughter in hopes of getting a little bit of charity, only to discover that the daughter had moved. When asked her name by police, Kate responded “Nothing.” Hours passed, and at 12:55 am on September 30, Kate, now sober, told her jailers that her name was Mary Ann Kelly of 6 Fashion Street, and was released. At one in the morning Kate leaves the police station by a route which would take her home by way of Mitre Square.

Shortly after one am, the body of Long Liz was discovered in Dutfield’s Yard, off Berner Street. An artery in her neck had been severed. About fifteen minutes later, Kate Eddowes’ body was discovered nearby. Her throat had been cut and her abdomen ripped open, an ear severed, her uterus and left kidney removed, her intestines pulled free and draped across her left shoulder. A piece of graffiti, chalked onto a wall near where a bloodied piece of Eddowes’ apron was found read “The Juwes are not the men who will be blamed for nothing,” sparking myriad conspiracy theories.

The next day a mob took to Whitechapel’s streets, demanding that police bring the killer to justice. On October 1, a letter signed “Jack the Ripper” would arrive at the Central News Agency, taunting the police and revealing details that had not been released to the press. The letter read, in part, “you’ll hear about Saucy Jacky’s work tomorrow double event this time number one squealed a bit couldn’t finish straight off. ha not the time to get ears for police.” A couple weeks later, on October 16, president of the Whitechapel Vigilance Commitee George Lusk would receive a small cardboard box in the mail. Inside was a human kidney preserved in wine and a letter reading (in full):

From hell.
Mr Lusk,
Sor
I send you half the Kidne I took from one woman and prasarved it for you tother piece I fried and ate it was very nise. I may send you the bloody knif that took it out if you only wate a whil longer

signed
Catch me when you can Mishter Lusk

This post is brought to you by Tales of Jack the Ripper, an anthology of seventeen stories and two poems examining the bloody legacy of the most famous serial murderer of all time. Ask for Tales of Jack the Ripper by name at a bookseller near you, or order the Saucy Jack Deluxe Pack from Word Horde.

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Tales of Jack the Ripper: Reviews Round-up

Tales of Jack the Ripper has been pulling in some outstanding reviews. Not bad for a book that’s only officially been out for less than two weeks. Here are just a few of the reviews…

JTRShelf

FEARnet.com‘s Blu Gilliand begins his review by asking the question, “is it okay to base a piece of entertainment on a real-life serial killer?” To find an answer, Blu takes an in-depth look at the anthology’s stories by Orrin Grey, Alan M. Clark & Gary A. Braunbeck, Joe R. Lansdale, Patrick Tumblety, and Walter Greatshell, then concludes, “What Lockhart has done with this anthology is to show that the Jack the Ripper story has grown far beyond who- or whatever murdered those women all those years ago. It’s become a myth, grounded in fact, and the reason it continues to hold power over us today is because we still don’t understand what happened, or why, and we likely never will. Stories like that are the stories that continue to frighten us, and until we can banish those shadows forever, there will always be writers wrestling with them on the printed page. Tales of Jack the Ripper manages to walk that fine line between entertainment and exploitation with real finesse. It’s a gripping group of stories about one of our most enduring mysteries, and well worth your time.” Read the full review at FEARnet.com.

At first concerned that he may not know enough about Jack to fully appreciate the anthology, SR Jones of Martian Migraine Press examines closely the tales by Ennis Drake, Pete Rawlik, Stanley C. Sargent, Ramsey Campbell, T.E. Grau, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Laird Barron, E. Catherine Tobler, Joe R. Lansdale, and Joseph S. Pulver, Sr. Admittedly thrown off by some of the anthology’s more experimental pieces, Jones awards Jack a five-star review, saying, “Editor Ross Lockhart (Book of Cthulhu and Book of Cthulhu 2, Chick Bassist) has done a stand-out job with Tales of Jack the Ripper. This one’s going out to certain names on my Christmas list, that’s for sure. You know the ones. With their ‘funny little games’. Recommended.” Read the full review at Martian Migraine Press.

Shock Totem‘s Mason Ian Bundschuh writes “There is a definite ‘weird tale’ edge to many of the stories (and poems) in the anthology, which in this reader’s opinion is a GREAT thing. It might even be expected from Lockhart, who also brought you The Book of Cthulhu and its follow-up, The Book of Cthulhu 2. This doesn’t mean you can pigeonhole Tales of Jack the Ripper.” Bundschuh singles out stories by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Ramsey Campbell, and Mercedes M. Yardley for their chilling excellence, concluding, “you need to get up off your lazy duff and buy this collection.” Read the full review at Shock Totem.

The Arkham Digest‘s Justin Steele ponders our societal fascination with serial killers and the Ripper’s legacy, finding insight in Orrin Grey’s tale “Ripperology.” Other stories considered and ruminated upon under Steele’s eye include those by Ramsey Campbell, Alan M. Clark & Gary A. Braunbeck, Joe R. Lansdale, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Ennis Drake, T.E. Grau, Ed Kurtz, Edward Morris, Joseph S. Pulver, Sr., Pete Rawlik, Stanley C. Sargent, Mercedes M. Yardley, and Laird Barron. Steele concludes, “Tales of Jack the Ripper marks a strong debut for Word Horde. Lockhart, in usual fashion, has managed to put together a strong, multifaceted anthology that explores the Ripper legend at length. If this book is indicative of what’s to be expected from his new press, than readers have much to look forward to.” Read the full review at The Arkham Digest.

Editor Ross E. Lockhart

The Arkham Digest have also just featured Steele’s interview with Tales of Jack the Ripper editor and Word Horde publisher/editor-in-chief Ross E. Lockhart. This interview includes not only insights into Lockhart’s aesthetic and goals in putting together Tales of Jack the Ripper, but a behind-the-scenes glimpse at Word Horde’s origins and future. Check out the full interview at The Arkham Digest.

This post is brought to you by Tales of Jack the Ripper, an anthology of seventeen stories and two poems examining the bloody legacy of the most famous serial murderer of all time. Ask for Tales of Jack the Ripper by name at a bookseller near you, or order the Saucy Jack Deluxe Pack from Word Horde.

Originally posted at Word Horde.

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Dark Annie

The black eye was healing, but still ached. Dark Annie had Eliza Cooper to blame for that. Something about a purloined penny, some stolen soap, and that handsome pensioner, Edward Stanley. The details were fuzzy for Annie sometimes, particularly when drink was involved, though the bruises were real. This had been a tough year. John had died on Christmas, drank himself to death, then Siffey left her once the money dried up. Annie had been forced to make her living where she could, and when embroidering antimacassars and selling flowers didn’t pay bed and board, she earned what she could on the streets. Her lungs ached, and she wanted one of her pills, but she was down to just two, secured in a corner torn from an envelope because her pillbox had broken. Friends called her Dark Annie because of her dark, wavy hair. In contrast, she was a pale woman with blue eyes, short and stocky. Annie was forty-seven years old.

It was just past midnight on Saturday, September 8, 1888. Annie shared a beer in the kitchen at Crossingham’s Lodging House with Frederick Stevens, then chatted with William Stevens, both fellow lodgers at Crossingham’s. She left for her room, but changed her mind and went out into the night. Around one-forty-five, Annie returned, eating a baked potato. She explained to lodging house deputy Tim Donovan and night watchman John Evans that she didn’t have her rent money, and asked that they hold her bed until she could earn enough on the street.

At five-thirty, Elizabeth Long, a cart-minder, was walking down Hanbury Street toward Spitalfields Market. The clock at the Black Eagle Brewery chimed as she passed No. 29 Hanbury Street, briefly making eye contact with Dark Annie, chatting up a dark, “shabby genteel” fellow in a deerstalker hat. Mrs. Long overhears their conversation as she passes, the man’s ardent “Will you?” Annie, in reply, whispered “yes.”

Elizabeth Long is the penultimate person to see Dark Annie alive.

Annie Chapman’s murder was particularly violent. Her throat had been cut from left to right. She’d been disemboweled, her intestines thrown over her shoulders. Her uterus had been cut out and removed from the scene. At the September 10 police inquest, Dr George Bagster Phillips described the murder weapon: “The instrument used at the throat and abdomen was the same. It must have been a very sharp knife with a thin narrow blade, and must have been at least 6 to 8 inches in length, probably longer. He should say that the injuries could not have been inflicted by a bayonet or a sword bayonet. They could have been done by such an instrument as a medical man used for post-mortem purposes, but the ordinary surgical cases might not contain such an instrument. Those used by the slaughtermen, well ground down, might have caused them. He thought the knives used by those in the leather trade would not be long enough in the blade. There were indications of anatomical knowledge…”

Police made several arrests following Annie’s murder, suspects included a cook, a butcher, and a hairdresser. But none of these panned out. The press, still reeling from the murder of Mary Ann Nichols, continued to sound an accusatory drum for Leather Apron, but within a few weeks, a new name would come to the forefront in the case, a named signed to a series of letters taunting the police. That name? Jack the Ripper.

Tales of Jack the Ripper

This post is brought to you by Tales of Jack the Ripper, an anthology of seventeen stories and two poems examining the bloody legacy of the most famous serial murderer of all time. Ask for Tales of Jack the Ripper by name at a bookseller near you, or order the Saucy Jack Deluxe Pack from Word Horde.

Originally posted at Word Horde

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